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In /messages, there should be an /xx directory for each language supported, where xx is your ISO-639 language code.

  • If there is not a directory for your language code, please create an empty directory /xx for your language, e.g. /vi for Vietnamese.

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  1. Look at the original text
  2. Think of the best way to express that in your language. This is not necessarily by translating each word, but by translating what the string is trying to say. For example, you will probably not get a good translation by substituting the words in your language for "zombie process", but when you look up a zombie process (see #Resources below) and find out that it is a process that has died, and won't go away, you can find a way to express that in your language. Always think about the job the string has to do. Make it do that job in your language.
  3. If you don't understand the string, firstly try looking up the words (#Resources), and/or asking other translators for your language. If you are still puzzled, please ask on the mailman-i18n mailing list: that's what it's for. (smile) Some of the Mailman strings are complex, so please don't feel shy about asking questions: we all do!
  4. Enter your translation.

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When you come back, now it's time to check your translation. You can check mailman.po by running msgfmt -cv -o /dev/null FILENAME (see #Resources), and the HTML and text templates by viewing them in your browser and text editor. Make sure there are no errors, before you submit your files. If there are any remaining errors, they will break Mailman, and your translation will not be used.

Also, Mailman has a tool, bin/transcheck, that will check for missing, extra and misspelled interpolation variables. You should run this to check your translation for these errors.

You can also build Mailman to test your translation. That's why you need to keep all Mailman's source files. (wink)

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Optimally, one person in your team should have this access, so s/he can manage the uploads. If nobody is doing this yet in your team, consider learning how to use bzr (Bazaar). It's not difficult, and it's a key tool in open-source translation. Please see the bzr links in #Resources.

Are you adding a new language?

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The new mailman.po file will automatically show any changes, any empty strings or "fuzzy" (incomplete) strings. Your editor (#Resources) should show a summary of those changes. For example, my translation editor, LocFactoryEditor on Mac OSX, shows a summary in the toolbar, what percentage of the file has been translated, and in the side-bar, how many fuzzy strings, how many untranslated strings etc.

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